Hello 2018!

Three main purposes to this short (really!) and hopefully sweet post:

  1. THANK YOU! I wanted to take a moment to thank everyone who may have checked out purposefulmovement in 2017 (or anytime, really!). I very much appreciate your reading, sharing, commenting and reflecting – I hope you found as much joy in doing so as I do writing these. 2017 brought over 6,000 views and over 4,000 visitors to the site and so…
  2. I wanted to break down the posts from this past year in order of views and share the top 6 (see below) because…
  3. In 2018 I’d love to have your input into the types of topics, issues and reflections you’d like to see tackled here on purposefulmovement. Is there a piece of research (or topic) that needs exploring? A current post that needs revisiting or expanding? A news item or social media post that requires a response? Let me know here and I’ll do my best to cover some of these in 2018!

I will, of course, keep writing posts as the spirit moves me! Right now I am percolating a number of post topics including reflective practice, failure, the ‘cutting’ debate (response to another blog), professional growth (I found some of my old papers from undergrad!) and an update (overdue, as usual) to the physical literacy series. As well, I hope to have a few guest blogs featured – stay tuned!

Check out the Top 6 posts below, let me know what you might want to read and I wish you all the best for 2018!

TOP 6 POSTS in 2017

  1. Teaching for Meaning in Physical Education. The title pretty much gives the topic here – 976 views
  2. Cuts like a knife – but it feels so… Post about the issue of cutting kids in sport – 677 views
  3. What the Health? The importance of health and physical education to our kids, schools and society – 372 views
  4. Something is very wrong… A response (from back in 2015!) to school ‘banning’ certain types of physical activity (from cartwheels to soccer balls to tag) – 356 views
  5. Delightful Physical Education. A cross post from the most excellent LAMPE blog – 269 views
  6. Purposeful Teaching – My Philosophy. Again, the title is pretty much the post (except for there are more words in the post…) – 223 views

Thanks again for popping in and reading what’s on my mind and heart!

May 2018 bring you success, failure, growth and joy.

 

#embracewinter

Today’s inspiration comes to you from Rover. That’s right. My dog Rover. It was a IMG_5261beautiful winter’s day: -6 C, bright sunny sky, snow covered ground. Lovely. I was out with Rover on a romp through the river valley close to my home (OK, he may have romped more than I…). But despite the beauty of the day, there really weren’t that many people out. I only encountered 2 other dog walkers, 1 jogger, a couple of solo walkers, 1 dad w 2 kids sledding and 1 XC skier – in an hour. Hmmm, I think we have a problem here.

As I walked, I started to think of the unique seasonal opportunities available to those of us who are fortunate enough to have winter. Yup. I said it. Fortunate to have winter. Snow. Ice. Cold. Glorious.

You see, I believe that we should #embracewinter. We embrace only the things we love. Winter and all it’s opportunities should be on that list. Unfortunately, over the past number of years, I have seen that love erode away  – even in Northern countries like Canada (although I think Norway and other Scandinavian countries still have it figured out!). Maybe it’s the over saturation of technology. Maybe we are afraid of frostbite. Maybe central heating and comfy couches have doomed us to a life without the joys of brilliant sun on blinding white snow and the sweet sounds of pucks and skates on outdoor ice. Maybe not.

Join me as I explore 5 quick ways to #embracewinter.IMG_5114

  1. Get some longjohns! You don’t have Rover’s coat so start with a quality base layer: thermal underwear and good socks. As for the rest, you don’t need a lot and a good base layer goes a long way! Get hand-me-downs, shop the thrift stores or build up key items one at a time. You don’t have to overspend to dress for the weather. #layerup
  2. Play! Get out there and try something outside. Go for a walk. Sled down a hill. Skate on a pond. Ski across a field. IMG_2635Snowshoe through a forest – you get the idea. Again, equipment can be minimal and not expensive. Ask for hand-me-downs. Sleds and toboggans on Kijiji. Shared winter toys in a neighbourhood, church or community league. Post a note at school announcing a winter equipment swap. #gearup
  3. Learn! Once you’ve tried a few new activities (or maybe ones you haven’t done since you were a kid) consider taking lessons to refine your skills (OK, IMG_1136sledding REALLY requires you to just slide down a hill…). I am not necessarily talking about formal lessons (could be an option). Find someone who loves to do a winter activity (same goes for summer) and I’ll GUARANTEE you they will be happy to go out with you and give you a few tips. These types of people love to share their love of winter and winter activities. Find them! #smartenup
  4. Model! When you demonstrate your love for winter and willingness to get outside IMG_3976you are contagious (ummm, the good kind though…). Be willing to share your skills and knowledge freely (see #3) with your own family and beyond. Be the person who is enthusiastic about the coming of winter and be sure to let others know (not obnoxiously though). Invite people to come out with you. Share equipment, spare clothing and solid advice. To coin a phrase – “Just Do It!” 😉   #getup
  5. Volunteer. Once you have (re)discovered your love for winter, take that next step and help others to be able to experience the same. Sign up to be the parent on the ski trip. Help run the local outdoor rink (clear, flood, skate, repeat!). Ask to supervise IMG_1131the toboggan hill before school. Facilitate the equipment and clothing swap. Invite a family new to winter and snow (new-immigrant families, university students, etc.) out for a night of sledding and hot chocolate. #helpup OK, I know that last hashtag didn’t really work – just buy into the theme will ya!

See you outside this winter! Rover and I are waiting for you…

IMG_3972

 

Move Daddy Move!

Seeing as how it was Father’s day yesterday (in Canada anyways…) AND it happens to be the longest day of play THIS week on June 21 – I figured I would write a short post connecting the two (brilliant, I know – thanks for noticing!).

First, some key stats:

  1. Youths whose fathers do more vigorous physical activity (VPA) are more likely to do weekly VPA AND get a higher number of days/week of VPA (see study here).

2. Since only 7% of 5- to 11-year-olds and 4% of 12- to 17-year-olds meet the daily recommendation of at least 60 minutes of MVPA (2009-11 CHMS, Statistics Canada via Active Healthy Kids Canada) and we know more boys than girls meet the 16,500 steps/day target (2012 Kids CANPLAY) – the findings from Jaffee & Rex (2000) are TRES COOL! 100% of girls with active fathers were physically active (compared with 86% of girls with active mothers).

So, my fatherly friends – not only is it important for you to be active for YOU, it is also important for your family! Nice work Dad!

Now, on to the longest day of play…

This initiative by ParticipAction is intended to take advantage of the longest day of the year (approximately 16 hours and 47 minutes here in sunny Edmonton, Alberta) and encourage everyone to get outside and move!

For all sorts of tools to spread the word, including a video, posters and idea sheets, go here.

So get outside and enjoy an ACTIVE father’s day (it’s good for you AND your family) – then do it all over again on the Longest Day of Play on June 21!

Move your daddy – move your family!

IMG_4255

Risky Business

Let’s face it.  Life is risky.  No buts about it – everything we do has an element of risk.  Sure, channel surfing on the couch is less risky  than actually jumping on a surf board in an actual ocean – or is it?  We’ll come back to this point but first let’s dig a little deeper into what risk is:

Everybody’s favourite encyclopedia defines risk as: the potential of loss (an undesirable outcome, however not necessarily so) resulting from a given action, activity and/or inaction. “Wait a minute… Only the potential for loss? What about all those famous quotes?

“Nothing ventured, nothing gained.” – Ben Franklin

“Do one thing every day that scares you” – Eleanor Roosevelt (and apparently the Lulu Lemon bag designer…)

 “The fear of death is the most unjustified of all fears, for there’s no risk of accident for someone who’s dead.” – Albert Einstein

 “Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing.” – Helen Keller

Looks like there is more to risk than just loss!  Let’s move to the concept of risk assessment – back to Wikipedia:

Risk assessment is the determination of quantitative or qualitative value of risk related to a concrete situation and a recognized threat (also called hazard). Quantitative risk assessment requires calculations of two components of risk (R):, the magnitude of the potential loss (L), and the probability (p) that the loss will occur.

cliffWow!  This risk business is more tricky than I thought, but I still think there is more involved than just the concept of what can be lost.  The above definition includes “value of risk” but then the equation is only (R) = (L)(p) – what about the potential gains?  Let’s try to find some context here by using an example from my summer holidays. Each year when my family hits Jasper National Park, we invariably end up at Horseshoe Lake flinging ourselves off of the cliffs into the crystal clear (and #frickinfreezing) waters.  If I use the formula for risk assessment it looks something like this:

RISK equals:

(L: fractures, contusions, water in places you don’t want water, death)

multiplied by

(p: chance of this happening based on height of cliff, skill, weather etc.)

Hmmm. I get it – bad things can happen.  But, what about factoring in the sheer joy of momentary flight?  The confidence boost of overcoming your fears?  The competence attained in managing your body in the air? I think TRUE risk assessment should also include the potential for GAIN as well as LOSS.  I’d like to propose a new formula:

R =    GAIN (M)(p)            multiplied by             EARNED COMPETENCE (S)(E)                LOSS (M)(p)

Essentially, both gain and loss are factored by multiplying the magnitude (M) by the probability (p); then gain is divided by loss and multiplied by EARNED COMPETENCE which is factored from skill (S) multiplied by experience (E) – easy right?  To redo my cliff jumping scenario (specifically my son asking to do a 45’ jump) after factoring in the potential for loss (people hurt themselves jumping every year), the potential gain (overcoming a fear of heights, gained competence) and, multiplying these by his previous experiences (diving board, previous cliff jumps) and skill level (tramp and tumbling skills, swimming level, balance) I whole heartedly gave my approval!  More importantly, I hope that I am teaching my kids to properly assess risk themselves – and not only for physical activity.

An article in wholeliving.com on the importance of taking risks states:

When we think of risk, images of hang gliding and rock climbing may come to mind — activities in which one false move can mean death of the most dramatic kind. But risk doesn’t need to involve danger; it need involve only uncertainty. Kruger defines it as “activities with uncertain outcomes” — and they aren’t necessarily bad. “There are possible positive outcomes to risks as well,” he says. “Otherwise, why would we take them?” (Daniel Kruger is a Psychologist)

Good point Dr. Dan!  Michael Ungar, author of the book Too Safe for Their Own Good (now on my Fall reading list), makes this comment on psychologytoday.com:

In psychological terms, we’ve known for a century that children who are pushed slightly beyond their comfort zone and given opportunities to fail in ways that won’t have long-term consequences, are children who do much better in life. But, as their caregivers, we need to give children opportunities to encounter danger and learn the rules for survival. A child who has never rode a scooter on a quiet street is a child ill-prepared for driving a car, much less walking to school and crossing a busy intersection. The risk-takers advantage is something we are psychologically and biologically driven to experience for ourselves. Far better to take risks when the danger is small and we are supervised than when we are older and unsupervised.

Did you catch that?  Opportunities to encounter danger.  Of course there are caveats (love that word) such as appropriate levels, supervision etc.  That is where my incredible formula comes in!  If, however, we never provide those opportunities for our children – how will they ever develop the ability to properly assess risk?  I once heard a speaker at a parenting session talk about raising strong kids rather than safe kids.  In his mind, if you taught your kids to be strong – you got “safe” thrown in as a bonus.  This may have been the same speaker who always told his own kids to “Be Aware” rather than “Be Careful”.  Subtle difference.  “Be Aware” implies risk assessment and confidence.  “Be Careful” implies avoidance and fear. Assess the loss.  Assess the gain.  Assess yourself (earned competence). Decide.

So.  Back to channel surfing vs. actual surfing.  A recent study on surfing injuries found that there were 6.6 significant injuries per 1000 hours (less than 1%).  Sedentary behaviour like channel surfing can lead to: an increase in triglycerides, decreases in ‘good’cholesterol levels, increased risk of obesity (24% per 2hrs/day of TV in adults), increased risk of chronic diseases (20% diabetes per 2hrs/day of TV) – just to name a few.  Hmmm…

As a parent, this is a pretty easy risk analysis – keep in mind that Canadian children and youth average 7 hours and 48 minutes of screen time a day.  As an adult, this is also a pretty easy risk analysis – even using my formula!

Surf’s up!IMG_4255